6-year-old boy suspended from school for kissing classmate’s hand

(Source: jjae, via alwayskindahopeful)

Exercise in pregnancy boosts baby’s brain development :

glamcandy5:

Woman Carrying Books, Photographed by Stanley Kubrick (circa 1940)

glamcandy5:

Woman Carrying Books, Photographed by Stanley Kubrick (circa 1940)

(via weekendswithjackie)

librawrian:

She blinded me with… 

librawrian:

She blinded me with… 

(via weekendswithjackie)

What a concept

(Source: radondoran, via weekendswithjackie)

newseum:

Today in News History: 

On Nov. 7, 1874, Harper’s Weekly cartoonist Thomas Nast depicted the Republican Party as an elephant for the first time. Nast is also known for creating the modern version of Santa Claus and popularizing images of William “Boss” Tweed, Uncle Sam and the Democratic donkey. 

To find out more about the story behind the illustration and how the elephant symbol developed over Nast’s career, read this explanation from the New York Times and HarpWeek. 

Photos are from the Newseum collection. 

congressarchives:

This post is part of a series displaying the work of the U.S. military and veterans in honor of Veterans Day.
The Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) association was established in 1899. Washington, DC, was host to the VFW convention in 1920. Cartoonist Clifford Berryman memorializes this event with his familiar character, Mr. DC, presenting the city on a platter to a veteran holding the American flag and his small valise. Sporting a large armband reading "welcome veterans," Mr. DC says to the soldier, "welcome, the city is yours."
Welcome Veterans by Clifford Berryman (6011633), 9/13/1920, U.S. Senate Collection

congressarchives:

This post is part of a series displaying the work of the U.S. military and veterans in honor of Veterans Day.

The Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) association was established in 1899. Washington, DC, was host to the VFW convention in 1920. Cartoonist Clifford Berryman memorializes this event with his familiar character, Mr. DC, presenting the city on a platter to a veteran holding the American flag and his small valise. Sporting a large armband reading "welcome veterans," Mr. DC says to the soldier, "welcome, the city is yours."

Welcome Veterans by Clifford Berryman (6011633), 9/13/1920, U.S. Senate Collection

georgetakei:

Oh myyy. http://ift.tt/1aWhJQw

Did you get the invitation

georgetakei:

Oh myyy. http://ift.tt/1aWhJQw

Did you get the invitation

georgetakei:

That’s what it’s all about. http://ift.tt/17x5adL

Rehabilitation

georgetakei:

That’s what it’s all about. http://ift.tt/17x5adL

Rehabilitation